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These millennial women have made a choice that many of their peers could never imagine: They’ve chosen to become nuns. ⬇️ Some millennial nuns work with the hungry and with communities decimated by the opioid crisis. Others help immigrants and educate them in citizenship classes. ⬇️ But in many ways, these nuns are just like you. They watch television, go swimming and play sports together. They spend the afternoons playing Settlers of Catan or running around outside with their dogs. ⬇️ Today, there are fewer than 50,000 nuns in the country, a significant decline from 180,000 nuns in 1965. One projection estimates there will be fewer than 1,000 nuns by the year 2043. ⬇️ The sisters worry what might happen as their numbers continue to dwindle. They hope that in time, God's call to the church will become more difficult to ignore for young women like themselves. Read more about these nuns at the link in our bio. 📷 Patti Sapone @psapo #nj #newjersey #millennials #easter

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Jay’s Bus Service has been involved in more crashes than any other private bus company in N.J. ⬇️ Its drivers have racked up hundreds of traffic tickets in the last decade. One driver was caught driving drunk with a bus full of kids. Another slammed into a parked car while high on Oxycodone. ⬇️ One district announced a potential savings of $7 million when it switched to the private busing company. The move is part of a larger nationwide trend of school districts cutting costs by outsourcing transportation to private busing companies rather than owning their own buses, experts say. ⬇️ The town might save money, but “there’ll be a cost in terms of injuries and fatalities,” said Michael Belzer, a professor from Wayne University. ⬇️ Jay’s Bus Service contracts with 20 school districts in New Jersey, and one contract just expanded to $2.4 million. – #njdotcom #nj #newjersey #truejersey #njschools

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Force hurts everyone — police officers, their subjects and even their police dogs. The use of force is a necessary part of policing in order for law enforcement to protect themselves and the public, but how do we know when it becomes excessive? ⬇️ The stakes are high whenever force is used. Among all the people police reported using force on, they injured more than 21 percent of them from 2012 through 2016. At least 9,302 people were injured by police in that span. ⬇️ Police struck nearly 20,000 people with their hands or fists in the five-year span. Thousands more were kicked, Tased and hit with pepper spray or a police baton. Police used deadly force on at least 344 people, and killed at least 71 of them during the same time period. ⬇️ The pain goes both ways. More than 6,500 officers suffered injuries over the five years analyzed. That means about 3.5 officers were injured each day, and more than 1,000 officers suffered multiple injuries in the line of duty in that time. ⬇️ Officers have been injured while they were stopping suicide attempts, helping autistic children in crisis and fending off attacks from people with guns, knives and even their teeth. During those five years, officers were threatened or attacked with… a knife at least 563 times, a gun 518 times, a car 473 times and shot at 99 times. ⬇️ Get a comprehensive look at all the ways force can affect people's lives at nj.com/force. ⏹ #NJForce

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